Lake Maxinkuckee Its Intrigue History & Genealogy Culver, Marshall, Indiana

Donald E. Mikesell



Don Mikesell Announces Candidacy For Sheriff In Republican Primary

Donald Mikeseli, 54 Culver , today announced his candidacy for the Republican nomination for sheriff of Marshall County in the May primary election.


Making his first venture into the field of politics, Mikesell; is presently the police chief of Culver , a position he has held for the past 20 years.

Mikeseli was born in Culver and is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Claude Mikeseli. He and his wife Alice (Handy) and son Robert B., reside at ( 611 School Street. They are also parents of Donald W. Mikeseli, Muncie, and Mrs. Harold ( J a n e t ) Lowe, Rochester. They have four grandchildren. Mikesell is a graduate of Culver High School in the class of 1931. He began working for the town of Culver i n 1941 until he entered the U.S. Navy in 1944 where he served 20 months, 16 of those in the South Pacific aboard an L.C.I. 709.

In November, 1945, he returned to Culver and was appointed police chief on Jan. 1, 1946. He also serves the town as street commissioner and park and recreation commissioner.

Chief Mikeseli has been a member of the Culver -Union Township volunteer fire department for 29 years. He is a ffiliated with the (F.O.P., American Legion, Lions, and is a charter member of the Culver V.F.W.

On Jan. 21, 1966 he was awarded the first Culver Jaycee Distinguished Citizens Award for his service to the Culver community







Monday, January 9, 1984 Rochester Sentinel

Donald E. MIKESELL, 72, of 611 School St., Culver , died at 8 p.m. Sunday in the Lakeshore Clinic at Culver following a sudden illness.

He was born May 30, 1911 in Culver to Claude and Clara EASTERDAY MIKESELL. He was a lifetime resident of Culver . He was a retired Culver police marshal, a U.S. Navy veteran of World War II, a 47-year member of the Culver -Union Township Fire Department, and a member of the American Legion, the VFW and the Eagles Lodge of Culver . He was married Oct. 6, 1934 in Plymouth to Alice M. HANDY, who survives.

Also surviving are a daughter, Mrs. Harold (Janet) LOWE, Rochester; two sons, Donald W. [MIKESELL], Muncie, and Robert D. [MIKESELL], Galveston, Texas; five grandchildren; a sister, Opal BENEDICT, Culver , and a brother, Oscar MIKESELL, Culver . Two brothers preceded in death.

Services will be at 11 a.m. Wednesday in the Bonine Funeral Home, Culver , with the Rev. Donald BOWMAN officiating. Burial will be in the Culver Masonic Cemetery. Friends may call after 2 p.m. Tuesday. Memorial service will be conducted by the Indiana State Fire Marshall’s Department at 7 p.m. Tuesday. Memorials may be made to the Culver -Union Township Fire Department or the Heart Fund.






Don "Mike" Mikesell was police chief for 22 years (1946- 1968). He was honored with the Citizen's Award from the Culver Chamber of Commerce in January 1966. His contribution to the town of Culver was his dedication to his service as police chief. He was also the water commissioner, a Marshall County deputy street superintendent, a member of the Fire Department and Lake Patrol. He helped many of the younger generation throughout their youthf ul days and steered potential juvenile delinquents away from trouble with patience, understanding and inspiring advice. He was a graduate of Culver High School and a veteran of World War II during which he served in the U.S. Navy.

He loved the kids, believed in Culver and wanted it to be a good place for kids. When the phone rang at home, the family knew he wo uld be away for a while. Not only did they have a phone in the house; they also had the fire bell. One Halloween night, some youngsters had fun rolling tires down a hill. Chief Mikesell was on duty, and he let them have their fun. The next morning he went to school and called out the names of the pranksters, telling them they must put the tires back as they found them, recalled Marlene Shoddy.

"Don Mikesell was a cop back in the time when kids feared cops. With him it was strange because he almost never arrested a kid. He found a way to make sure the kids knew that they sho uldn't do it again, whether it was by taking them to their parents, or some other method," said Larry Berger.







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