Lake Maxinkuckee Its Intrigue History & Genealogy Culver, Marshall, Indiana

Alfred Morton Glossbrenner  



Alfred M. Glossbrenner Culver Citizen -
23 Nov. 1938, Wedensday

A. M. Glossbrenner Dies of Heart Trouble

Funeral services were held Wedenesday, Nov. 16, for A. M. Glossbrenner, of Indianapolis, who died suddenly of heart trouble while sitting in a chair in his home, Sunday, Nov. 13. Services were held in the Scottish Rite Catherdral. He was a well-known East side cottager.






Alfred M. Glossbrenner - Among the young Republicans of Indianapolis none is regarded with more confidence than Alfred M. Glossbrenner, whose sagacity and business judgment make him valuable in the councils of his party, and whose unflagging energy commands res ults. His whole life is an encouraging example of the rich rewards to be gained by perseverance, industry and self respecting integrity. Mr. Glossbrenner has just passed thirty, yet he is second in authority in one of the largest business concerns in the State, has served with honor a term in the legislature, is gladly received in the best clubs in the city and his opinions are eagerly sought in business and political affairs.

Mr. Glossbrenner was born in Jeffersonville, Indiana, August 13, 1869. With the exception of six years in the public schools, he is entirely self-educated. His family removed to Indianapolis, in January, 1882, and there he found employment first as a newsboy, then as a cash boy in a large store. The boy was ambitious to better his condition and lost no opportunity to pick up knowledge by the wayside. His evenings were spent in the study of bookkeeping and accounting and the common school branches, the study of which he was not permitted to pursue at school. After he had been in Indianapolis a year he secured a minor position in an office, and at the same time spent fine nights in the week in the study of commercial law and other branches calc ulated to fit him for a business life. At the age of eighteen he secured a position as bookkeeper and general office man with the printing house of Levey Brothers & Co., which had removed from Madison to Indianapolis, and started the printing business in a small way. He at once made himself valuable to the concern by directing his whole energy to the improvement of the business. His advancement was steady and at the present writing he is Secretary and Treasurer of the company whose business has grown to great proportions, and to whose large success his own skill and industry have contributed in a very substantial way. His business life has been characterized by aggressiveness, sagacity and strict integrity.

He exhibited an early interest in politics, and his political activity has been characterized by the same qualities which made him successf ul in business. His influence in the councils of the Republican party had grown to such an extent that in 1898 the legislative nomination was tendered to him without his seeking, and at the earnest solicitation of his friends he accepted it, although at the cost of sacrifice to his business. He conducted a good campaign and was elected to the Sixty-first General Assembly. During this session of the legislature he was known as an active, caref ul and influential member, noted for his steadfastness of purpose and rigid adherence to his convictions. His influence, gained by quiet, moral force, was felt in the promotion of many good measures, as well as in the defeat of measures promoted by selfish interests. Mr. Glossbrenner is credited with being the first to suggest Albert J. Beveridge as an available candidate in 1899 for United States Senator, and he assisted verymaterially in organizing and directing the campaign which terminated in the election of Senator Beveridge.

Personally, Mr. Glossbrenner is modest and retiring, but withal cheerful and genial in companionship and has a host of friends in every walk of life. He is a Scottish Rite Mason, a Noble of the Mystic Shrine, a Knight Templar, an Odd Fellow, a member of the Knights of Pythias and of the Commercial Club, and belongs to the Marion and Columbia and other Republican clubs. He has never been smiled upon by good fortune, and has found many obstacles in the way of his progress, but his aggressive spirit and tenacity of purpose have advanced him steadily, until, at the age of thirty, he enjoys a place in the business and political life of the city of Indianapolis, which few men enjoy, and, besides, has the universal respect of his friends.

Mr. Glossbrenner was married November 14, 1894 to Minnie M. Stroup of Waldron, Indiana, and has on child, Daniel Independence, who was born July 4, 1896. - - History of the Republican Party of Indiana : biographical sketches of the party leaders Indianapolis: Indiana History Co., 1899, pg. 282-3






Alfred M. Glossbrenner. In reviewing the record of the life and achievements of Alfred M. Glossbrenner, the vice-president and manager of the Levey Brothers and Company, Indianapolis, and a former legislator, it is found that the course he has followed has gained him respect and admiration, for it was in comparative obscurity that he started out on life's journey for himself. Dominated by a progressive and enterprising spirit, energy and industry stood him instead of capital and crowned his efforts with prosperity.

Mr. Glossbrenner has spent his life in the State of Indiana. He was born in its town of Jeffersonville August 15, 1869, and with the exception of six years he spent in its public schools he is entirely self-educated. Moving with his parents and their family to Indianapolis in January of 1882, he here found employment as a newsboy, later as a cash boy in a large store, and while beginning this upward climb on life's ladder he lost no opportunity to gain knowledge, his evenings being devoted to the study of bookkeeping and accounting and other branches of learning which were denied him at school. After a year's residence in this city he secured a somewhat humble position in an office, and while thus employed spent five nights of the week in the study of commercial law and other branches intended to fit him for a business life. On attaining the age of eighteen he secured the position of bookkeeper and general office man with the printing house of Levey Brothers and Company, a corporation which had moved from Madison to Indianapolis and embarked in the printing business here on a small scale. Young Glossbrenner at once made himself valuable to the concern by directing his entire energy to the improvement of its business, and his advancement with the house was steady and even until he finally became the secretary and treasurer of the company and lastly and at present its vice-president and manager. During these years the business of the corporation has grown to splendid proportions, commensurate with the life and standing of its office head.

Throughout nearly his entire identification with Indianapolis Mr. Glossbrenner has exhibited an interest in political activity, and his influence in the councils of the Republican party have been far-reaching and effective. In 1898 the legislative nomination was tendered him without his seeking it, and accepting the honor, although at a sacrifice to his business interests, he conducted a good campaign and was elected to the Sixty-first General Assembly. During this session he was known as an active, caref ul and influential member, honored for his steadfastness of purpose and rigid adherence to his convictions, and his influence was felt in the promotion of many good measures. To him belongs the distinction of being the first to suggest the name of Albert J. Beveridge as an available candidate for United States Senator, and he assisted materially in organizing and directing the campaign which terminated in the election of this senator on April 28, 1906. Mr. Glossbrenner was appointed by Mayor Charles A. Bookwalter a member of the City Sinking Fund Commission in October, 1908, and by re-appointment is the present incumbent of that office. He is a Scottish Rite Mason, a Noble of the Mystic Shrine, a Knight Templar, an Odd Fellow, a Knight of Pythias, and a member of the Commercial Club, a member and was the treasurer of the Marion Club four years, having held this office longer than that of any other of its members, and is a member of the Columbia and other Republican clubs and the Governing Committee of the Board of Trade. Few men are leaving an example more worthy of em ulation than he, and he enjoys a place in the business, political and social life of Indianapolis accorded to but few.

Mr. Glossbrenner married Miss Minnie M. Stroup, of Waldron, Indiana, November 14, 1894, and they have three sons, Daniel Independence Glossbrenner, born July 4, 1896; Alfred Stroup, June 6, 1901; and George Levey, September 15, 1904. Greater Indianapolis : the history, the industries, the institutions, and the people of a city of homes Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1910, Dunn, Jacob Piatt pg. 987-8






Alfred M. Glossbrenner. When the Glossbrenner family moved to Indianapolis in January, 1882, from Jeffersonville, Alfred M. Glossbrenner who was born in the latter town August 15, 1869, was a few months past twelve years of age. At Jeffersonville he had been in school for six years. His association with formal institutions of learning practically ended with his removal to Indianapolis.

The first occupation which he dignified and made a source of living income in Indianapolis was selling newspapers. He also worked as a cash boy in a large store. A year later he became an office employee of humble status and with a vague routine of duties. In these days much is heard of vocational education, by which boys are furnished a training fitted into the practical affairs of business and life. Led by ambition and energy Alfred Glossbreener figured out a system of vocational training for himself while he was working for a living in stores and offices. As opportunity offered he applied himself to the study of bookkeeping, arithmetic and various other branched, the mastery of which he realized as a necessity to his continued advancement. While in the office he spent five nights a week in the study of commercial law.

The door of opportunity opened to him at the age of eighteen when he was taken in as bookkeeper and general office man with the printing house of Levey Brothers & Company. This business had recently moved from Madison to Indianapolis. It was not of the biggest concerns of Indianapolis when Mr. Glossbrenner became identified with it. But he proved himself superior to his normal functions and was soon supplying some of the energy and ideas which promoted the upbuilding and broadening out of the concern. With the growing success of the company his own position became one of larger responsibilities, and in the course of promotion he was made secretary and treasurer, and subsequently vice president and manager. Levey Brothers & Company is now one of the largest firms in the general printing and stationary business in Indiana, and much of the success of the house is credited to Mr. Glossbrenner.

In other ways he has proved himself a man of usef ulness in his home city. He has always taken an active part in republican politics, and in 1898 accepted the nomination for state representative at a considerable sacrifice to his personal business affairs. During the Sixty-first General Assembly he made his influence felt in the promotion of many good measures. Mr. Glossbrenner is credited with having first formally brought the name of Albert J. Beveridge to the attention of the people of Indiana in connection with the honor of United States senator. He helped organize and largely directed the campaign which finally elected Mr. Beveridge to a seat in the Upper house of Congress April 28, 1906. In October, 1908, Mayor Charles A. Bookwalter appointed Mr. Glossbrenner member of the City Sinking Fund Commission.

He is well known in social and fraternal affairs, was treasurer of the Marion Club four years, is a member of the Columbia and other republican clubs, has been on the governing committee of the Board of Trade, is a member of the Commercial Club, is a Knight Templar Scottish Rite Mason and Shriner, an Odd Fellow and a Knight of Pythias.

November 14, 1894, he married Miss Minnie M. Stroup, of Waldron, Indiana. Three sons were born to them. Daniel Independence Glossbrenner, born July 4, 1896; Alfred Stroup, born June 6, 1901; and George Levey, born September 15, 1904. - - Indiana and Indianans : a history of Aboriginal and territorial Indiana and the century of statehood Chicago: American Historical Society, 1919, Dunn, Jacob Piatt, pg. 2056-7






Alfred M. Glossbrenner, president and treasurer of the Levey Printing company, The Shield Press, is one of the men of real achievement at Indianapolis. At the head of one of the oldest and most substantial business concerns of this city, his activities have made it a power in the publishing field, while in other directions, politics, philanthropy, public, steadfast, usef ulness and community interests of all kinds, his energizing influence has long been felt.

He comes of old colonial family settlement and of Revolutionary stock. His father's ancestors came to America in 1750, while his mother's ancestors, Quakers, came from England to Pennsylvania with William Penn, and both families were represented in the Patriot army in the Revolutionary War. His great grandparents were pioneer settlers in Indiana, and his father, who was in the United States mail service for many years, often recalled with interest that in his boyhood, in 1847, he was a passenger on the first railroad train to enter Indianapolis.

In 1888, Mr. Glossbrenner became identified with what is now known as the Levey Printing company, which celebrated its seventy-fifth anniversary in 1923, having been founded in 1848, by William P. Levey, a practical bookbinder from Philadelphia. A large business grew in those wonderf ul developing years, from a small beginning, and in 1888 its possibilities and advantages appealed so strongly to the tastes and inclination of Alfred M. Glossbrenner, then a young man seeking a congenial field of effort, that he applied for employment and was engaged as bookkeeper and general office man. Promotions followed, inevitably, and for a number of years Mr. Glossbrenner has been president and treasurer of this organization, which under his guidance was reincorporated in 1919 as the Levey Printing company. He is the originator of the company's surname, The Shield Press, and founder of its publications, The Shield, which has been issued for fourteen years, and Bank Notes, two decades old. He has developed a highly specialized business and at the same time widely diversified, constituted of two main divisions, one being commercial printing and stationery manufacture, and the other the production and marketing of bank supplies. In its employment policy the company operates under what is known as the American plan.

As may be imagined, Mr. Glossbrenner has a wide journalistic acquaintance and among his associates and close friends, will be found those who, like himself, are writers and judges of good literature. Early interested in political questions and firm in his convictions concerning them, at the age of twenty-nine years he was elected to the Indiana General Assembly and justified the confidence of his fellow citizens as a statesman. During 1912-13 he served as president of the United Typothetae of America, of which he was vice-president one year and treasurer three years, and it was his proposal, at the Buffalo convention concerning the establishment of a training school, which brought into being the Typothetae School of Printing, now operated as a branch of the Arsenal Technical schools in Indianapolis.

In 1917, he was elected president of the Indianapolis Board of Trade and is still a member of its Board of Governors; for some years he was a director of the Indiana Manufacturers' Association, and for twenty years has been a director of the Associated Employers of Indianapolis. Sixteen years ago, he was appointed by Mayor Bookwalter, a member of the board of Sinking Fund commissioners and continues as president of the board. Marion county can easily recall his vigorous and patriotic policy as president of the War Board of Business Organizations of this city, by which the second Liberty Loan campaign was brought to a highly gratifying conclusion, and during the subsequent loan campaigns, he served as one of the three members of the Marion county executive committee. He is a director of the Fletcher American company and was a member of the building committee of the new Indianapolis Athletic Club. In private life as well as in public, Mr. Glossbrenner is respected and esteemed, and numerous organizations of the city, fraternal, social and benevolent, have profited by his generosity and public spirit. - - History of Indiana From Its Exploration to 1922 With an Account of Indianapolis and Marion County Vol. IV by Logan Esarey, Dayton Historical Publishing Co, 1924







Historical Site of Indianapolis

Alfred Glossbrenner Mansion (1910)
3202 N. Meridian St.
32nd and Meridian Streets


The Shelbyville Democrat Saturday, October 5, 1907 - PERSONALS.- Mrs. Alfred Glosbrenner and children, of Indianapolis, are visiting Mrs. Glossbrenner's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Stroup, of this city.






Samuel P. Stroup

The family of this name origiated in Holland, the emigrant founder being George Stroup,...His son, Reuben, who was born in Berks county, Pennsylvania, came west with his parents and remained in Ohio about fifteen years. He married Mary Ann Hahn, a native of Shenandoah county, Virginia, and daughter of Samuel and Margaret Catherine (Stover) Hahn, a family of some distinction. Mrs. Hahn's father was Captain Joseph Stover, who earned his rank as a Virginia soldier in the Revolutionary war. John Hahn, father of Samuel, also enlisted from Virginia in a patriot regiment... To Reuben and May Ann (Hahn) Stroup six children were born,... Samuel. The father died August 29, 1852, in Preble county, Ohio, and in 1860 his widow married Daniel Cotterman, an old school mate, by whom she had one son, Elmer C. After marriage they removed to Wayne county, remained there until 1870, and then returned to the old Shelby county home. Daniel Cotterman died August 29, 1877, and his wife on November 6, 1906.

Samuel P. Stroup was born on the Liberty township farm, in Shelby county, Indiana, November 12, 1846... On January 5, 1872, Mr. Stroup married Elizabeth C., daughter of Daniel Cotterman, his step-father. The youngest of their four children died in early infancy, but...Minnie M... Minnie is the wife of Alfred M. Glossbrenner, half owner in Levy Brother's Printing Company, Indianapolis; their children are Daniel I., Albert Reuben and George L... - - Chadwick's History of Shelby County, Indiana, by Edward H. Chadwick, B.A., assisted by well known local talent, B.F. Bowen & Co, Publishers: Indianapolis, IN, 1909, Page 841.






Indianapolis City Directory, 1889. Indianapolis, IN: R.L. Polk and Co., 1889 & 1890.

Name: Alfred M Glossbrenner
City: Indianapolis
State: IN
Occupation: bkkpr
Year: 1889 & 1890
Business Name: Levey Bros & Co
Location 2: b 149 Ash






Alfred Morton Glossbrenner born b. 15 Aug. 1869 Jeffersonville, Indiana d. 13 Nov. 1938 Indianapolis, Marion, Indiana bur. 16 Nov 1938 Section: 42 Lot: 63 Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Marion, Indiana he was the son of william Jacob Glossbrenner and Jane rowan Cox m. 14 Nov. 1894 Name: Minnie May Stroup borm 24 Apr 1874 Waldron, Indiana died 12 Dec 1950 - Indianapolis, Marion, Indiana Find-A-Grave has d. 1951 bur. 1 June 1951 Section: 42 Lot: 63 Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis, Marion, Indiana daughter of Samuel P. Stroup & Elizabeth C Cotterman


Catey Rasmussen: “Then, too, The Glossbrenner Family bought "The Wigwam" [even tho an early cottage on the south side was also named the Wigwam or Pottamomii and owned by Daniel Mc Donald] about 1905, developed the golf course, and printed a small history of The Maxinkuckee Association which includes Indian Legends. My Grandmother Glossbrenner had Indian rugs and pictures in their cottage. How we wept, my three sisters - even my brother, when that cottage was sold about 1936 at Grandfather A.M. Glossbrenner's death.” Year: 1900; Census Place: Indianapolis, Marion, Indiana; Roll: 388; Page: 7B; Enumeration District: 61
Alfred M Glossbrenner 30
Minnie M Glossbrenner 29
Daniel I Glossbrenner 3

Year: 1910; Census Place: Indianapolis Ward 4, Marion, Indiana; Roll: T624_367; Page: 10A; Enumeration District: 0075;
Alfred N Glossbreuner 40
Minnie M Glossbreuner 36
Daniel I Glossbreuner 14
Alfred S Glossbreuner Jr. 9
George L Glossbreuner 6
William Hampton 26 Hired Man
Therasa Burry 26 House: Cook

Year: 1920; Census Place: Indianapolis Ward 4, Marion, Indiana; Roll: T625_452; Page: 19B; Enumeration District: 83;
Alfred Glossbrenner 50
Minnie Glossbrenner 45
Alfred Glossbrenner 18
George Glossbrenner 15

Source Citation: Year: 1930; Census Place: Indianapolis, Marion, Indiana; Roll: 608; Page: 17A; Enumeration District: 53
Alfred M Glossbrenner 60
Minnie Glossbrenner 56
George L Glossbrenner 25

They Had: Children:
1 Daniel Independence Glossbrenner b. Jul 4, 1896 in Indianapolis Marion Indiana United States d. 25 Dec 1983 in Covington, Louisiana buried Van Pelt Cemetery Waldron, Shelby, Indiana; married: 8 Sep. 1819 Marion co., In. [Bk. 105 pg. 82] Edna Josephine Schn ull b. 5 Nov 1894 in Indianapolis Marion Indiana d. 3 March 1973 in Indianapolis Marion Indiana buried Van Pelt Cemetery Waldron, Shelby, Indiana daughter of Gustav A. Schn ull and Matilda L. Mayer.



Daniel was secretary-treasurer of the Marmon-Harrington company, working for the Marmon brothers

1920; Census Place: Indianapolis Ward 4, Marion, Indiana; Roll: T625_452; Page: 1A; Enumeration District: 103;
Daniel I Glossbrenner 23
Edna Schnell Glossbrenner 25

1940; Census Place: Lawrence, Marion, Indiana; Roll: T627_1075; Page: 9B; Enumeration District: 49-18A.
Household Members: Name Age
Daniel Glossbrenner 43
Edna Glossbrenner 45
Daniel Glossbrenner 19
Emily Glossbrenner 18
Mary Glossbrenner 17
Catherine Glossbrenner 14
Jane Glossbrenner 4
Dora Bacon 30 servant
Mary Wilkins 39 servant

Name: Danl I Glossbrenner
Gender: M (Male)
Residence Year: 1935
Street Address: Itaintiow Farm Oaklandon Ind
Residence Place: Indianapolis, Indiana
ccupation: Sec-Trea
Spouse: Edna Glossbrenner
Publication Title: Indianapolis, Indiana, City Directory, 1935

Name: Danl I Glossbrenner
Gender: M (Male)
Residence Year: 1940
Street Address: Oaklandon
Residence Place: Indianapolis, Indiana
Occupation: Sec-Treas
Spouse: Edna S Glossbrenner
Publication Title: Indianapolis, Indiana, City Directory, 1940

    children:
    1 Daniel Independence Glossbrenner, Jr b. 08 October 1920 in Indianapolis Marion Indiana d. 12 Dec 2002 in Indianapolis Marion Indiana married Betty Teter
      Betty Teter Glossbrenner's parents, James and Jessie Teter, came in 1919 to Oaklandon. They farmed 80 acres across Sunnyside Road from the old Sunnyside Sanatorium - now Westminster Village North. Betty Glossbrenner worked for one year as operator for the Oaklandon Telephone Co.

      Dan Glossbrenner moved in 1927 to the Oaklandon area. His parents, Daniel and Edna Glossbrenner, purchased 240 acres and Rainbow Farm grew to 1,000 acres. The senior Dan Glossbrenner had been a captain in the famous Rainbow Division during World War I. By World War II, he was a colonel- still with the Rainbow Division.
    2 Emily L Glossbrenner married {-?-] Diamond,
    3 Mary E Glossbrenner married [-?-] Batchelor
    4 Catherine Matilda Glossbrenner
    b. born October 16, 1925 died January 27, 2010 m. James Wood Rasmussen
    5 Jane Glossbrenner married [-?-] Cozier
2 Alfred Stroup [Reuben] Glossbrenner b. 6 June 1901 died 8 Oct 1990 - Youngstown, Mahoning, Ohio married: Ramona Bertram b. 19 Sep 1901 Sturgis, Kentucky d. 6 Apr 1988 Youngstown, Mahoning, Ohio daughter of Charles O Bertram and Stella [-/-]

Place: Indianapolis, Marion, Indiana; Roll: 610; Page: 6A; Enumeration District: 76;
Alfred Glossbrenner 28
Romona Glossbrenner 28
Alfred Glossbrenner 4
David Glassbrenner 3

They had:
    Alfred Bertram Glossbrenner Caroline ruth Keller they had:
      Alfred keller David Forker Nancy Russell
    David Withers Glossbrenner Janica Henkle

    They had:
      Christopher Glossbrenner Holly Glossbrenner Mellisa Glossbrenner Talitha Glossbrenner
3 George Levey Glossbrenner b. 15 Apr. 1904 Indianapolis, Marion, Indiana d Nov 1975 - Ava, Douglas, Missouri; married [-?-]; Enlisted in the Army on 17 Nov 1942 Indianapolis, Indiana WWII







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